2023 State of Climate Services for Health

02 November 2023

As the world warms at a faster rate than at any point in recorded history, human health is on the frontline.

Climate change threatens to reverse decades of progress towards better health and well-being, particularly in the most vulnerable communities. Scientific know-how and resources can help redress the balance, but are not sufficiently accessible or utilized. WMO's annual State of Climate Services report this year focuses on health.

It highlights the need for tailored climate information and services to support the health sector in the face of more extreme weather and poor air quality, shifting infectious disease patterns and food and water insecurity.

The report, which includes input from more than 30 collaborating partners, features case studies from around the world showcasing how integrated climate and health action makes a very real difference in people's daily life. This includes early warnings systems for extreme heat, pollen monitoring to help allergy sufferers and satellite surveillance for climate-sensitive diseases.

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Heatwaves and The City

Human health stands on the frontline in the face of a warming world surpassing historical rates. Climate change threatens to undo decades of progress in achieving better health and well-being, especially in the most vulnerable communities. A new multi-agency report coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) highlights that despite scientific knowledge and resources to rebalance this equation, they are not adequately accessible or utilized. This documentary case study offers insight into the impacts of heatwaves on the city of Athens and its residents. It underscores the effectiveness of combining early warning systems in the short term and nature-based solutions in the long term as crucial strategies for adapting to climate change.

2023 State of Climate Services - Health

As the world warms at a faster rate than at any point in recorded history, human health is on the frontline. Climate change threatens to reverse decades of progress towards better health and well-being, particularly in the most vulnerable communities. Scientific know-how and resources can help redress the balance, but are not sufficiently accessible or utilized, according to a new multi-agency report coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).
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Key messages
  • Climate change threatens to reverse health gains
  • Extreme heat causes greatest mortality of all extreme weather events/ hazards
  • Climate information and services help manage and predict health risks
  • Case studies showcase success stories around the world